Felix Pullover Knit-Along : Week 3

Felix Pullover Knit-Along : Week 3

Continuing our Felix Pullover KAL, this week we are discussing:

-installing a lifeline
-dividing the body and sleeves
-casting on in the middle of a round
-bust shaping with German Short Rows

Watch Week 3 on YouTube

Emily touched on adding a bust adjustment to your Felix sweater during our week 3 video, but we thought it would be helpful to provide written instructions, as they involve a bit of math! 

Why can’t we just wave our knitting needle wand and produce one set of instructions for everyone? It’s because we’re all knitting different sizes and with different bust measurements! If you want your short row shaping to fit your body, you’re going to have to do the math. 

Why add bust shaping?

Adding short row bust shaping to a sweater creates an extra wedge of fabric that will roughly cover the underside of the cup and lower the front hemline accordingly. For large-busted individuals, this can help offset the typical rise of the front hemline often seen when wearing commercially available garments. 

Do I have to add bust shaping if I have a larger bust?

No! This is a completely optional step. If this is your first sweater, we’d actually recommend building on your current momentum and just knitting the sweater as directed in the pattern. It will still fit and look great!

Adding your bust shaping:

After you have split for the sleeves and knit one plain row, thread a lifeline into your work and try it on. You will want to start your short row shaping at the fullest part of your bust, so if you haven’t reached that point yet, knit a few more rows and try your sweater on again.

Once you have reached the fullest part of your bust, you can begin your short row shaping. Remember to use the same short row technique (wrap and turn, German short rows, Japanese short rows, etc…) that you used for the back of the neck!

Begin by finding the halfway point across the front of your sweater (yes, including half of the stitches you cast on for each underarm!) and mark it with a locking stitch marker. This will help keep you oriented as you centre your short rows around this marker, and help you keep track of how many short rows you have knit.

You will want to measure and compare your upper bust and full bust measurements and choose the instructions that correspond to your unique shape.

If you have 2-3” of difference, you will knit 4 short rows. You will do your first turn at (around) the 75% point across the front. You will add 10 stitches between turns. 

Using Emily’s 100 stitch front as an example:

50% of front stitches (halfway point) = 50 stitches. This is where she will place her locking stitch marker.

75% of front stitches = 75 stitches. This is where she will make her first turn, aka 25 stitches past her locking stitch marker.

Emily’s short rows:

  1. Knit 75, turn.
  2. Purl 25 to locking stitch marker. Purl another 25 stitches. Turn.
  3. Knit to last turn, resolve the short row stitch according to whatever method you are using, knit 10, turn.
  4. Purl to last turn, resolve the short row stitch according to whatever method you are using, purl 10, turn.
  5. Knit around, resolving any remaining short row stitches according to whatever method you are using. 

And you are done!

If you have 3-4” of difference, you will knit 8 short rows. You will do your first turn at (around) the 70% point across the front. You will add 5 stitches between turns. 

Using Emily’s 100 stitch front as an example:

50% of front stitches (halfway point) = 50 stitches. This is where she will place her locking stitch marker.

70% of front stitches = 70 stitches. This is where she will make her first turn, aka 20 stitches past her locking stitch marker.

Emily’s short rows:

  1. Knit 70, turn.
  2. Purl 20 to locking stitch marker. Purl another 20 stitches. Turn.
  3. Knit to last turn, resolve the short row stitch according to whatever method you are using, knit 5, turn.
  4. Purl to last turn, resolve the short row stitch according to whatever method you are using, purl 5, turn.
  5. Repeat rows 3 and 4 until you have done 8 rows total.
  6. Knit around, resolving any remaining short row stitches according to whatever method you are using. 

And you are done!

If you have 4+” of difference, you will knit 12 short rows. You will do your first turn at (around) the 65% point across the front. You will add 5 stitches between turns. 

Using Emily’s 100 stitch front as an example:

50% of front stitches (halfway point) = 50 stitches. This is where she will place her locking stitch marker.

70% of front stitches = 65 stitches. This is where she will make her first turn, aka 15 stitches past her locking stitch marker.

Emily’s short rows:

  1. Knit 65, turn.
  2. Purl 15 to locking stitch marker. Purl another 15 stitches. Turn.
  3. Knit to last turn, resolve the short row stitch according to whatever method you are using, knit 5, turn.
  4. Purl to last turn, resolve the short row stitch according to whatever method you are using, purl 5, turn.
  5. Repeat rows 3 and 4 until you have done 12 rows total.
  6. Knit around, resolving any remaining short row stitches according to whatever method you are using. 

And you are done!